Regd. Office: Revathi Bhavan, Edathala P O, ALUVA-683561. Reg.No.: ER 18/10 of 2010 Telephone No.: 0484-2837414 Email:cochinnaturalhistorysociety@gmail.com


WELCOME TO THE COCHIN NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY

The Cochin Natural History Society is a non-profit making, non-political charitable institution registered under the Travancore-Cochin Literary, Scientific and Charitable Societies Registration Act, 1955. This is a society of amateur naturalists who live in harmony with nature and seek to protect and to preserve the biodiversity and healthy natural environment. The mandate of the society is to undertake studies and documentation of biodiversity around us and to draw attention to the aesthetic, economic, scientific and conservation aspects.The society also intends to provide a platform to those who are concerned to come together and share, enlarge and correct our knowledge about Nature and its magnificence. Any person, who has a love, interest and commitment towards conservation of our biodiversity and natural history may become a member of the society*.







"You can know the names of a bird in all languages of the world,but when you are finished ,
You will know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird.....
So let`s look at the bird and see what it`s doing --that`s what counts.
I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something."


-Nobel Laureate Richard P Feynman(1918-1988)


Monday, November 8, 2021

National Bird watching Day 2021(12 November) Celebration

 Sa`lim Ali Bird Count on 12/11/2021

Social Forestry Division, Ernakulam and Cochin Natural History Society

Program

eBird Protocol: - 15 Minutes. Travelling - -Min. 4 lists (One Hour) - No upper limit. 

eBird Group ID: - salimalibirdcount

Timeframe: - 6.30 am to 9.30 am. (between)

Please contact the team leaders indicated below and confirm your participation. Prior knowledge of birding is not necessary. The team leaders may decide on the exact start time as per sunrise/weather conditions etc.,

Please ensure COVID-19 protocol as applicable. Necessary support will be provided by the Social Forestry Division, Ernakulam.

Area/Location                 Team Leader                   Contact

Edavanakkad-Thamaravattom –Kuzhuppilly  Ajay Rajan                  8089234209

HMT Estate Kalamassery.                 Polly Kalamassery          9745222131

Iringole Kavu.                         Ginu George                   9447029953

Kandakkadavu-Kalathara-Kuthirakkoorkari.   Kiron Vijay & Jayadev Menon    

                                                                                                                         9895068760/9846226224

Karumallore-Kadungalloore-Veliyathunadu.         Premchand                      9895348813

Mangalavanam.                         Latha Prabhakaran              9447465920

Moozhikkulam Sala-Parakkadavu.                 Chins Chandran           9744304440

Nedumbassery-CIAL-Suvarnodyanam.         Santhosh Kumar                   9495127660

Puthuvaipe/Valappu Beach- ICT Road.         Mahesh R                   8304004816

RECCA Enclave Kakkanad.                 Sudhakaran K K           9895765863

Subash Park.                         Latha Prabhakaran                 9447465920

Thripunithura Wetlands.                         Sony Nambiar           9387462376


Those who cannot report at any of the above sites, can participate in the program by doing bird watching anywhere within the Ernakulum District area  and upload their observations on to the eBird using the mobile app with the same protocol as above, and share the checklists to the eBird Group ID :-   salimalibirdcount

Please do share pictures of birds and group photo of participants also to:-

   cochinnaturalhistorysociety@gmail.com   

Happy Birding!!!


Saturday, October 30, 2021

Submissions on the proposed amendments to The Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 from Cochin Natural History Society,Kerala, India

 

Executive Summary

The Hon’ble Prime Minister made a commitment at the Asia Ministerial Conference 2016, where he said, “I strongly believe that tiger conservation, or conservation of nature, is not a drag on development... The Consultation Paper, in our considered view, is not in conformity with the letter and spirit of the said statement of the Hon’ble Prime Minister. Furthermore, it ignores the current scientific knowledge on conservation of forests.

What’s Positive

The term ‘Pristine Forests’ must not be restricted to just areas with Very Dense or Dense forests but must encompass all unique natural ecosystems with high biodiversity values and providing refuge to endangered species, including Protected Areas. The proposal to enhance the penal provisions for violation of Section 2 is absolutely necessary to enhance deterrence. However, a period of one year, in our view, is grossly insufficient.

What’s missing –

The consultation paper, regrettably, has completely missed the most important forest conservation issue that is central to the legislation that is under review viz. Forest fragmentation. It would therefore be critically important to have a specific provision in the Act to curb further fragmentation of large, contiguous forested landscapes. The CAG has found that 73% of non-forest land that had to be transferred and notified as RF / PF in lieu of diversion of forest land had not been received. Monitoring of conditions imposed is the weakest link in the forest clearance process. Since most violations are clearly intentional, there is little or no scope for rectification later. Many user agencies including Government authorities commence work on the non-forest land portions first, and present the FAC with a fait accompli. The Supreme Court in the Lafarge Judgment (2011) has clearly flagged this aspect and has directed that remedial measures be put in place. We are therefore of the opinion that these major loopholes require to be plugged by way of specific provisions in the legislation - which are included in this submission - and not merely by way of Guidelines.

What’s Retrograde

The proposal to exempt lands acquired by certain agencies for Railways, Highways etc is highly objectionable. It is a fact that the claims of such User Agencies on Rights of Way (RoWs) in many cases are tenuous. Therefore, such proposals may be considered de novo and, on a case-by-case basis under the Act. The proposal of exempting Extended Reach Drilling (ERD) – for exploration and extraction of oil and natural gas – from the purview of the Act is extremely detrimental to forest conservation at multiple levels. The proposal to reclassify Zoos, Safari parks, Forest training infrastructure and delete them from the category of non-forestry activity is retrograde and must not be considered. It is requested that the Ministry of Environment considers these pragmatic and properly justified comments and suggestions appropriately and ensures that the Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 is amended to carefully balance conservation imperatives and development aspirations.

2. Opening Statement

The Hon’ble Prime Minister made a commitment at the Asia Ministerial Conference 2016, where he said, “I strongly believe that tiger conservation, or conservation of nature, is not a drag on development... All we need is to reorient our strategy by factoring in the concerns of the tiger in sectors where tiger conservation is not the goal...Thus, we need to define conservation as a means to achieve development, rather than considering it to be anti-growth”. The Consultation Paper on the proposed amendments to the Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 is, in our considered view, not in conformity with the letter and spirit of the said statement of the Hon’ble Prime Minister. Furthermore, it is devoid of the current scientific knowledge on conservation of forests. Consequently, in our opinion, the proposed amendments will fail to strike a reasonable balance between conservation imperatives and development aspirations. Our pragmatic submissions are based on over three decades of active field work on conservation of forests and wildlife, interventions on policy and law, including our body of work on the National Board for Wildlife, and the subcommittee on amendments to the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972, the Boundary Rationalisation Committee, collaboration with State Forest Departments and site inspection committees of the NTCA.

3. Specific Comments and Submissions on the Consultation Paper

3.1: What’s Positive about the proposed amendments –

3.1.1: The proposal to introduce an enabling provision in the Act to keep certain pristine forests with high ecological values intact are welcome and in line with the objects of the law. However, two suggestions to ensure that it is further strengthened are as follows –

- The clause “for a specific period” be deleted since such pristine natural forests are national treasures and require to be protected in posterity for future generations; and - The term ‘Pristine Forests’ must not be restricted to just areas with Very Dense or Dense forests but must encompass all unique natural ecosystems including grasslands, wetlands, deserts, thorn forests etc with high biodiversity values and providing refuge to endangered species, including Protected Areas.

 3.1.2: The proposal to enhance the penal provisions for violation of Section 2 is absolutely necessary to enhance deterrence. However, a period of one year, in our view, is grossly insufficient. We therefore suggest the following –

- That the term of imprisonment for any person who contravenes or abets the contravention of Section 2 must exceed two years and also with fine which shall not be less than five Lakh rupees. Apart from increased deterrence, this will ensure that the procedure applicable for warrant cases under the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973, will apply. As correctly stated in the Consultation Paper, the offence must be classified as Cognizable and Non-bailable. Further a proviso may be added to clarify that if a public servant is alleged to have committed or abetted the commitment of an offence, prior sanction of the Government to prosecute would not be necessary.

 

 3.2: What’s missing from the proposed amendments

3.2.1: Forest Fragmentation or Honeycombing:

The consultation paper, regrettably, has completely missed the most important forest conservation issue that is central to the legislation that is under review viz. Forest fragmentation, which is the breaking up of large blocks of forests into smaller patches due to ill-planned intrusion of developmental projects. Scientists of the National Remote Sensing Centre (NRSC), in a published peer reviewed scientific paper titled - National assessment of forest fragmentation in India, have concluded that - “Fragmentation is one of the single most important factors leading to the loss of bio-diversity in forest landscapes… The analysis revealed that in all bio geographic zones, more than 90% of total number of forest fragments consists of patches having area less than 1 km2…. The decreased mean patch size, increased edge density and increased number of patches from 1975 to 2005 indicates ongoing fragmentation in bio geographic zones. The very high fragmentation in Trans Himalayas is contributed mostly by the natural factors while in other bio geographic zones, increased fragmentation is due to deforestation…The results are advocating the need for rational management of the forest cover of India”.

 

It would therefore be critically important to have a specific provision in the Act to curb further fragmentation of large, contiguous forested landscapes applying the principle of avoidance. Further, clearance for forest land only for those site-specific project components –while diverting all other components to areas outside forests E.g. Components of a Mining Project viz. Site-specific - Ore body; Non-site specific - Beneficiation/Pellet Plant, Township; will greatly minimize the impact of fragmentation and loss of natural forests.

This is crucial for keeping natural landscapes intact, which is necessary to mitigate the impact of climate change and for securing wildlife corridors. Based on the findings of the Government’s own scientific agency, and in order to ensure a pragmatic balance between conservation and development, we suggest the inclusion of the following provision in the Act –

Section 2 (iii) that any proposal for diversion of forest land amidst large forest blocks or forming part of a contiguous forested landscape, or both - irrespective of the extent of the area sought – shall ordinarily not be considered.

Provided that in small, scattered pockets of forests that do not form part of a Protected Area or contiguous forested landscape connecting two or more Reserved Forests, or an important wildlife niche or wetland, General Approval may be considered for critical development and public utility projects proposals, excluding mining and encroachment regularisation, based on appropriate Guidelines that incorporate due safeguards and mitigation measures.

 3.2.2. The CAG in their Audit Report No. 21 of 2013 had found that over 75,000 ha of non-forest land that User Agencies had to mutate and transfer to the Forest Department in order to secure Stage II clearance had not been received. This amounted to a staggering 73% of non-forest land that had to be transferred and notified as RF / PF in lieu of diversion of forest land. This is thus a major loophole in the Guidelines that requires to be plugged by legislation. The transfer or mutation of non-forest land immediately adjacent to RFs/PFs and/or within enclosures of RFs or PAs/Tiger Reserves or buffers or in areas forming important wildlife corridors can significantly contribute to consolidation of forests, which will in turn mitigate the impact of fragmentation and ensure Afforestation in such buffer areas which will be of greater value than in scattered parcels of land. It is therefore our view that this loophole must be decisively plugged by inclusion of the following new section which could be in the following form –

- 2A. Transfer and Mutation of non-forest land. – Notwithstanding anything contained elsewhere in this Act, the User Agency shall transfer and mutate suitable non-forest land, immediately adjacent to RFs/PFs or within enclosures of RFs or Protected Areas or, in Buffer Areas of Tiger Reserves or wildlife corridors, identified and included in the Land Bank prepared by the State Forest Department, before grant of Stage II clearance.

3.2.3: Monitoring mechanism:

Monitoring of conditions imposed is the weakest link in the forest clearance process. The loopholes in the current regime - including the current on-line forest clearance system - give ample scope for exploitation by unscrupulous project proponents in collusion with authorities involved. Since most violations are clearly intentional, there is little or no scope for rectification later without timely detection, as is the situation now. This forecloses the option of preventing the destruction of forests, which is the primary object of this legislation

It is therefore our view that this important regulation must be included in the Act and not merely in the Guidelines. This, in conjunction with the proposed increase in penalties, will further increase deterrence and contribute to prevention of forest destruction.

We therefore suggest that this important lacuna is appropriately addressed by the introduction of a new section which could be in the following form – -

2B. Monitoring of Projects. - Any non-forestry activity approved under Section 2 shall be monitored throughout the validity of the period for which the approval has been granted, by the Deputy Conservator of Forests having jurisdiction over the area along with the Regional Empowered Committee.

 Explanation. - For the purposes of this section, “monitoring” means site inspection of the project area at the time of commencement or breaking up of forest land, and during all key identified project milestones set forth in the approval, and annually including randomly at any time, if complaints of violations are received.

3.2.4 Preventing Fait accompli situations:

Where portions of forest and non-forest land are involved in a project, many user agencies including Government authorities / PSUs deviously commence work on the non-forest land portions first, and present the FAC with a fait accompli. Citing the investments made, they then seek – and usually receive - ex-post facto clearances. Many agencies are even using this as a clever strategy by splitting up projects to secure clearances that otherwise would not have been possible. This is particularly true in cases of linear intrusions like highways, power lines etc. The Supreme Court in the Lafarge Judgment (2011) has clearly flagged this aspect and has directed that remedial measures be put in place.

 We are therefore of the opinion that this major loophole requires to be plugged by way of a specific provision in the legislation and not merely by way of Guidelines. In this view of the matter, we suggest that the following section be included in the Act –

 - 2C. Regulation on Ex-post facto Clearances. –

(1) Every user agency shall ensure, in cases where projects involve forest as well as non-forest land, which work shall not commence on non-forest land till approval of the Central Government for release of forest land under Section 2 has been obtained. –

(2) Proposal seeking ex-post facto clearance shall not be considered and approval shall not be granted unless the Central Government being satisfied, in consultation with the Forest Advisory Committee, only in exceptional cases, after charging NPV at the highest applicable rate, for the entire extent of non-forest land as well, where work was carried out, grant clearance on a one-time basis only in respect of the User Agency.

 

Explanation. – For the purposes of this section – (a) “Ex-post facto clearance” means clearance under Section 2 for diversion of forest land, after commencement of work on non-forest land by splitting or bifurcation of a project or otherwise. (b) “One -time basis” means one single consideration in respect of the User Agency or Government Department for the first offence only.

3.3: What’s Retrograde in the proposed amendments

3.3.1 The proposal to exempt lands acquired by certain agencies for Railways, Highways etc is highly objectionable. Fundamentally, this proposal forecloses the application of several principles prescribed by the current legal regime including landmark Judgments of the Hon’ble Supreme Court which include payment of Net Present Value, appraisal of the proposal in terms of site specificity, prescription of the principle of avoidance of linear intrusions as a primary criterion, and evaluation of feasible alternative alignments etc. It is a fact that the claims of such User Agencies on Rights of Way (RoWs) in many cases are tenuous to say the least and may not be supported by proper documentation and records. This has the potential of creating legal complications with conflicting claims of ownership, and, consequently, prolonged litigation. Therefore, the proposals, if any, moved by such User Agencies may be considered de novo and on a case-by-case basis under the Act. We therefore submit that the proposal to exempt lands acquired by certain agencies for Railways, Highways etc deserves to be completely excluded.

3.3.2 The proposal of exempting Extended Reach Drilling (ERD) for exploration and extraction of oil and natural gas from the purview of the Act is extremely detrimental to forest conservation at multiple levels. When seen in conjunction with the proposal to exempt survey and investigation from the regulations contained in the Act, this proposal can have cascading negative impacts. Riding on these exemptions, several ancillary non-forest activities like roads, power lines, pipe lines etc will piggy back on the exempted activity, with potentially serious consequences. When such ERD technologies are not even being insisted upon for laying of HV DC Power Cables, OFCs etc, it would not be appropriate to keep ERD outside the purview of the Act. We are therefore of the clear view that this proposal must be completely removed and should not be considered.

3.3.3 The proposal to re-classify Zoos, Safari parks, Forest training infrastructure and delete them from the category of non-forestry activity is retrograde. If this is permitted, the demand to include other activity likes Elephant Camps, Eco-tourism infrastructure; visitor centres etc will surely follow. Therefore, Zoos, Safari parks and Forest training infrastructure must continue to be classified as non-forestry activity.

 

 4. Conclusion: It is requested that the Ministry of Environment, Forests & Climate Change considers these pragmatic and properly justified comments and suggestions appropriately and ensure that the Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 is amended(if at all) to carefully balance conservation imperatives and development aspirations.

Friday, July 3, 2020

Afforestation drive in HMT Campus in Kalamassery- faulty implementation

To,

Mr. BALAMURUGESAN S
General Technical Manager (MTK)
Machine Tools Division, 
HMT Limited,
HMT Colony P.O. Kalamassery 683 503,
Ernakulam Dist.


Dear Sir, 


Sub:-   Afforestation drive in HMT Campus in Kalamassery-  faulty   implementation  - reg.


This has reference to the move now underway in the Kalamassery campus of  HMT Limited, to  plant  trees in a haphazard  manner, especially large numbers   of teak saplings in a monoculture fashion.

We deeply appreciate the  initiative   of the HMT Limited and the Kerala Forest Department, to plant trees in  the HMT campus  (even as it is necessitated    by the obligation  to plant trees, in lieu  of large areas  of natural  tree cover mowed  down for Kochi Metro  Casting yard) . We are also  very much concerned that the move is an ill executed and done  in a  completely unscientific and haphazard manner, probably wasting public resources on an ill conceived scheme.


Grounds:

A large part of  the area where tree saplings are now  planted is an ecologically degraded land area – which was degraded in the first  place by mowing  down the largely undisturbed patch  of natural tree cover ,for the metro casting yard.

This calls for an approach applying the principles of ecological restoration.

We are very much concerned  that a large area of the land is planted  with teak saplings in a monoculture plantation fashion.

 This is a completely ill thought out move-so to say.  We tried to talk to the senior Officials  of both HMT limited, and the Social forestry Division, Ernakulam, and expressed our concern over the manner in which the tree planting is being done  and especially the decision to plant teak trees in a monoculture plantation mode.   The  reason expressed by these officials is that it will  economically benefit for HMT Ltd., as and when the plantation can be cut and sold.

Teak is a notoriously water guzzling tree species - even more so than the  eucalyptus and wattle .


Teak plantation depletes the ground water table  of this area, thereby affecting the water security and livelihood of the people  of the surrounding area.

The argument that it will economically benefit the HMT ltd, is also a fallacy  as it will take 50-60 year for trees to grow large  enough to be economically beneficial, by the time which,  the plantation will  have depleted enough ground water to cause serious  damage to the environment.This is unpardonable as  we all are facing mass extinctions,  unprecedented floods and droughts and many other ecological and environmental catastrophes ,in the face of which we cannot bring more damages to the environment, by our thoughtless actions.


One more thing is that the teak tree plantations  suck up all nutrients from the soil so much that the area planted  will be barren and damaged ecologically  beyond repair, whereby other trees and plants won't be able to grow healthy.

Another thing  we noticed is that the saplings already planted are of inferior quality apparently ,as they are already showing signs of wilting.


Therefore we propose that ,

The unscientific tree planting drive be stopped forthwith.

The services  of  ecological restoration experts in planting of the trees may be obtained.

The trees suitable for the elevation, agro climate conditions, soil nature,and the ecological niche  be selected as per the  advice of the experts.

Principles such as associated species and complementary species  be observed while planting is done.

Indigenous, threatened  and endemic species suitable  for are may be selected for planting.

Ideas like the Mixed Species Forest Plantation  may be explored as per the advice of the experts.

The planting may be done as per the advice of the experts keeping the mixed tree species planting concept. This will increase the structural complexity of the plantation thereby enhancing the biodiversity and the ecosystem functioning of the area.

As you are very well aware of, sufficient expertise in  restoration ecology , afforestation practices  etc., are available in Kerala, such as, Kerala Agricultural University(College of Forestry) ,  etc.,

This available pool of expertise   must be utilized and the participation of local NGOS  and the general population in the surrounding areas may be obtained and utilized so that the replanting drive is  a long term ecological success story.

We once again appreciate and reaffirm  our solidarity with the decision to plant trees in HMT Campus Kalamassery.



Sincerely Yours,        

       Sd/-

Secretary
Cochin Natural History Society
Reg.No.: ER 18/10 of 2010  
Regd. Office:
(Klathil) Revathi Bhavan, Edathala P O, ALUVA-683561. 
Telephone No.: 9446437410
e-Mail:-cochinnaturalhistorysociety@gmail.com

Facebook Page :-     https://www.facebook.com/CochinNHS/

Blog :-                       http://cochinnaturalhistorysociety.blogspot.in/



 


Friday, January 10, 2020

Asian Waterbird Count 2020 Ernakulam District

AWC 2020 Press Release-New Indian Express




വാർഷിക ജലപക്ഷി കണക്കെടുപ്പ്    (ഏഷ്യൻ വാട്ടർ ബേർഡ് കൌണ്ട്) –

എറണാകുളം ജില്ലാ - 2020



എറണാകുളം ജില്ലയിലെ ജലപക്ഷി കണക്കെടുപ്പ് 2020 ജനുവരി 12 നു നടത്തപ്പെടുന്നു. കൊച്ചിൻ നാച്ചുറൽ ഹിസ്റ്ററി സൊസൈറ്റിയും കേരള ശാസ്ത്ര സാഹിത്യ പരിഷത് വരാപ്പുഴ യൂണിറ്റും ചേർന്നാണ് പരിപാടി സംഘടിപ്പിക്കുന്നത്.
ജലപക്ഷി കണക്കെടുപ്പ് (Waterbird Count) നടക്കുന്നത് ഏഷ്യൻ വാട്ടർ ബേർഡ് കൗന്റിന്റെ (Asian Water bird Count) ഭാഗമായാണ് .ജലപക്ഷികളുടെ സാന്നിധ്യവും എണ്ണവും   തണ്ണീര്ത്തടത്തിന്റെ    പാരിസ്ഥിതിക ആരോഗ്യത്തിന്റെ സൂചകങ്ങൾ ആണ് .അതുകൊണ്ടാണ് വാർഷിക കണക്കെടുപ്പ് - ലോകമെമ്പാടും നടത്തപെടുന്നത് - വളരെ പ്രാധാന്യം അർഹിക്കുന്നതാകുന്നത്.
ജലപക്ഷികളുടെ നിർവചനം പറയുന്നത് “Species of birds that are ecologically dependant on the Wetlands“
ഗള്ളുകൾ (Gulls),ഗ്രെബ്കൾ(Grebes), സ്റ്റോർകുകൾ(Storks) ,നീർകാക്കകൾ(Cormorants) ഡാർട്ടർകൾ(Darters) റെയിൽകൽ(Rails) സ്‌നൈപ് കൾ(Snipes) താറാവുകൾ(Ducks) ഗീസുകൾ(Geese)  കൊറ്റികൾ കൊക്കുകൾ(Herons) , മണലൂതികൾ(Sandpipers) ഫ്ളമിംഗോകൾ(Flamingo) മുതലായവയാണ്‌ ജല പക്ഷികളുടെ ഗണത്തിൽ പെടുത്തിയിട്ടുള്ളത്.

ഇത്തവണ കണക്കെടുപ്പ് നടത്തുന്നത് ജനുവരി 12 ആം തീയതി ആണ് രാവിലെ 7 മണി മുതൽ 10 .30 വരെ ആണ് കണക്കെടുപ്പു. പക്ഷികളിലും പ്രകൃതിയിലും താത്പര്യം ഉള്ള ആർക്കും പങ്കെടുക്കാം.    ജല പക്ഷികളെ തിരിച്ചറിയാൻ കഴിവുള്ള വിദഗ്ദ്ദരുടെ കൂടെ പക്ഷി നിരീക്ഷണത്തിന്റെ ബാല പാഠങ്ങൾ പഠിക്കുവാനും ഇത് ഒരു അവസരമാണ് .പക്ഷികൾ നമ്മുടെ നില നില്പിനു് അത്യാവശ്യമായ ജീവികളാണ് അവയെ പഠിക്കുകയും സ്നേഹിക്കുകയും ചെയ്തു ആവാസ വ്യവസ്ഥ സംരക്ഷിക്കാൻ ശ്രമിക്കേണ്ടത് നമ്മുടെ കർത്തവ്യമാണ്.
ഈ പക്ഷിനിരീക്ഷണ കണക്കെടുപ്പ് പരിപാടിയിലേക്ക് എല്ലാ പ്രകൃതി സ്നേഹികളെയും സ്വാഗതം ചെയ്യുന്നു

കൂടുതൽ വിവരങ്ങൾക്ക് ബന്ധപ്പെടുക:- 9446437410

വിഷ്ണുപ്രിയൻ കർത്താ .കെ

Thursday, November 28, 2019

Kerala Bird Race 2019 -Invitation

India Bird Races 2019 - 20
to enjoy birds … and learn from their ways

LET’S COME TOGETHER FOR OUR BIRDS

A rendezvous with birds of and around urban India!

The 13th KERALA Bird Race will be held on Sunday, 01st December 2019.

The Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited (HSBC), along with Kerala Birder, Cochin Natural History Society, Kerala Agricultural University along with Kerala’s birding community, are organizing this unique programme in and around the city. The all-India coordinator for the India BirdRAces is The Yuhina Canopy, while UWM is the Facilitating Partner.

As more of us people come into the urban world, we are not only shrinking natural landscapes immediately around our expanding urban centers but also our impacts on nearby wildernesses is escalating as well.

The India BirdRaces are a popular, non-competitive program for the joy of birding, that serves to bring together all the birding enthusiasts, from rank beginners to experts and professionals, as well as NGOs, birding groups, city administrations, forest and wildlife personnel and others in every city it is organized. This exciting program is conceptualized to help look at the avifauna (birdlife) of our urban and their surrounding wealth of habitats and serve to popularize bird-watching and help lead to a better understanding of other aspects of our biodiversity and environment.

After all, birds are often the foremost attraction for anyone interested in exploring the natural world. Birds are often also the most visible and moving indicator for changes happening around us, changes influenced by our actions. The BirdRaces help document many sites around every venue, up to an area of at least 40 – 50 km from the radius of every urban area, and we get a trend of what is increasing or retreating or disappearing.
These BirdRaces are simple, enjoyable and interactiv events, beginning from dawn and ending at an interactive get-together at a prominent venue, over dinner and chats and presentations and sharing of thoughts and lots more.
There is a Bird-of-the-Day team prize this year.
The evening Meet-Up of the program this year will be at The Surya Luxury Hotel, Near Kochi Intl. Airport, Railway Stn. Road, Angamaly.

The Chief Guest of the Function is Sri. S Unnikrishnan(IFS), Deputy Conservator of Forests, Kerala Forest Department .

 There will be a screening of the documentaries  The Urban Canopy(Dir: Sujith M G) on the importance of our vanishing urban biodiversity of Kochi city and White Cloud(Dir: Mahesh Maanas)  both by the Green Grace Trust followed by Dinner.

With nearly 3000 people collectively partaking across more than a dozen Indian cities between November and March, the India BirdRaces are possibly the greatest birding event.
Invaluable data has been gathered to this fun event that is no less serious than science.
A day well spent for the cause of birds and urban environment!
All bird enthusiasts are encouraged to participate!!

For participation register at:

Click Here:

There will be a briefing session at Mangalavanam Bird Sanctuary at 5 pm Saturday 30 November

For details contact:
9446437410

Vishnupriyan Kartha.K



Salim Ali Bird Walk, Thattekkadu, 17 November 2019.